Music Review – Adam Winn “Burnout”

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Adam Winn’s new EP features a melancholic and relatable story of the emotional struggles in a failing relationship. Adam Winn is a singer-songwriter who focuses on creating compelling stories that are told through his music. Winn’s musical aesthetic touches on. He is backed by musician Dave Tolley on the drums.

A hometown hero in Fort St. John, BC, Adam Winn has worked as a firefighter for the past nine years. Having been trained in bass guitar and classical voice, Adam Winn never gave up on his love of music and turned to storytelling through grassroots music. Adam Winn’s new EP was successfully crowd funded, and he is set to embark on his first tour around Western Canada late July.

For first time listeners, the most striking aspect of Adam Winn’s work is the beautiful, clean guitar work and deep bass of his voice. Interestingly, Adam Winn’s vocal technique and enunciation sounds slightly more country than most folk singers, and this brings a unique quality to his songs. From the thickness of his voice, you can tell that Adam has had years of experience singing and is comfortable with a wide vocal range, being able to sing both mellow vocal lines and louder technical lines with ease. The guitar sounds very clean and crisp, which is an important aspect of folk music.

Adam Winn elected to keep his work clean with little effects on the sound. The vocals are kept center and forward to allow the listener to know where their attention should be focused. This by no means takes away from the instrumental accompaniment however as the sounds are balanced carefully to allow harmony between each part. Almost all parts of the mix are kept quite dry with little to no reverb. This fosters a more intimate listening experience.

In his song Burnout, Winn added a harmonica to the song to make the song more enticing. However, personally I thought the harmonica was a little bit distracting due to the stark difference in sound between the guitar and overall mood of the song. Initially I also thought the melody of the harmonica was quite strange or that perhaps there had been some wrong notes played, but after a few listens I realized the harmony was correct and that perhaps it was just my dislike for the sound of the harmonica.

The music video of Winn’s song Burnout was filmed by Jess Greene. The video shows a comfortable studio in which the musicians play. This studio matches Winn’s campfire folk music aesthetic. Much like Winn’s music, the video was kept simple and clear with much of the focus being on Winn as he sings. The mood of the video helped enhance the melancholic vibe of the song and makes the listener feel more relaxed. It was a little awkward however watching Winn for most of video as it felt as though he was purposely trying to avoid looking at the camera and didn’t quite know where to look.

Listen to Adam Winn’s song Burnout here:

Further Listening: Ray Lamontange, Glen Hansard, Bright Eyes

Websites:
https://adamwinn.bandcamp.com/releases
https://www.facebook.com/adamwinnmusic/

Review: HundredMillionThousand – LP1

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Album art by Victoria Diaz and Tobias Oliva

HundredMillionThousand’s new EP features a moody journal of the many faucets of mental illness and the producer’s experience with the subject. HMT is fronted by producer Noel Jon whose musical aesthetic touches upon a brooding and suspenseful atmosphere.

HMT’s debut album “LP1” proves to possess a dark and melodramatic core. Jon’s moody aesthetic is especially prevalent in the lead single “Yalda”.

The musical elements in “Yalda” are harmonious and prove to be an easy listen which is due to the careful composition of the instrumentation. HMT demonstrates his mindfulness when composing this single to make sure that the sounds are balanced and not too crowded.

In “Yalda”, HMT definitely wanted the bass to be the main component of the song. I noticed that they brought the bass to the front and every other instrumentation is put in the background to support it.

HMT’s “Yalda” features real, treated vocals with an added stutter effect. This stutter effect was added to the sounds on the vocal line at the beginning and the effect was similar in other parts of the single. This composition provides an eerie and unforgettable EP track. The vocals on “Yalda” are excellent because the song has a heavy bass line, but the vocals are able to cut right through them.

I think the reason why it sounds like the vocals were inputted is because HMT pushed the fader up quite a bit, which adds to the effect of the vocals slicing through the bass line.

Furthermore, reverb was added to the vocals to really broaden the kind of sound HMT was aiming for. So this adds to the song in an excellent manner.

I thought the transition (like 3/4 of the way through the song) was really well done because they were successfully able to introduce an almost completely new theme that changed the pace of the song. There were still some slight noises in that tiny section where everything was cut, however, that was just to help the listener know that the transition wasn’t the end of the song.

The use of white space was also extremely successful in this instance.

The melodic line also has some very slight pitch shifts which I thought were quite cool.

My experience of listening to the lead track is positive because I thought “Yalda” is an excellent composition and the vocals are unique. I thought the song was hauntingly beautiful.

Further Listening: Transcendence, Boards of Canada, Inward

HMT_Photo6_Photographer- Nicholas Yee

Press Photo by Nicholas Yee

Websites:
http://www.hundredmillionthousand.com/
https://www.facebook.com/hundredmillionthousand/
https://twitter.com/HunMillThou
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9wUhoUMtJb2dzw3xKfyy2A
https://www.instagram.com/hundredmillionthousand/

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Song Art By Danielle Muntain